Dallas E. Boggs, PhD

DRINKING

When I was in the school in nutrition, Dr. Maynard threw a party for the whole department. I skipped the party because they served cocktails the party and I didn't want to be around people that were drinking.

Following summer doctors Williams threw an outdoor picnic party for us, and I didn't attend that either--for the same reason.

That got me into trouble.  Dr. Maynard called me in his office and said I had two strikes against me.  One, I didn't go to his party; and two, I missed the picnic.  He said, nobody could afford to be so independent, unless he is a genius—and, “You are not a genius.”

The next time there was a party that was when one of my fellow students was having party for passing his qualifying exam.  It was on a winter evening at his house out in the country.  It's snowed that evening and most people cannot make it to the party. I was lucky, because I rode with Jack; and he was driving a Volkswagen.  There were four or five of us in his car, and we got out and helped push the car up the hill to our friend’s house.

Since they had prepared for about 30 people, and only a few of us got there, you can imagine we had pretty wild party.  That was the first time I ever drink beer, and must have had two or three.  I know I felt good, but I must of made a bit of a scene because somebody gave me the hot foot. (Stuck some matches in the crease between the sole an top and then lit them).

The next time I got happy was at the University of Wisconsin in 1963.  With Dr. Waisman out of town, we had a party at which we spiked grape juice with 200 proof alcohol and cinnamon spice.  We banged on pots and pans and had a wild time. While in Madison, I started going downtown once awhile and having a beer. But I never got really soused.

I started drinking regularly after we moved to California. I would meet my crew at the Rustic Inn every weekday after work, and we would have a few glasses of draft beer while we played horse (roll the dice).  The loser had to buy a round.

I never got drunk, drinking  just enough to loosen my tongue. One evening, I do remember walking up London Ranch Road after dark and meeting a car.  I stepped aside to let him pass, and I stumbled into a deep culvert.  I was relaxed enough that I didn't get hurt, but I have always wondered about the driver of the car.  What did he think when he saw me walking by the road and then suddenly disappear?

I drank at the Rustic just about every day during the two years I was at Sonoma; and when we moved to Pomona, near Los Angeles, to work at Pacific State Hospital, I thought that I would not have a place to drink. But I soon found one, and I continued to drink a few beers most every day.  But I never got drunk.

After we moved to Columbus OH, I joined the V. F. W. as a social member so that I could get six percent beer on Sundays.  I did get a bit intoxicated a few times the never really got falling down drunk. have you ever heard what happens to a frog who is placed in boiling water? He jumps out. But when placed in lukewarm water, he remains there and becomes comfortable where he eventually dies.  have you ever heard what happens to a frog who is placed in boiling water? He jumps out. But when placed in lukewarm water, he remains there and becomes comfortable where he eventually dies.have you ever heard what happens to a frog who is placed in boiling water? He jumps out. But when placed in lukewarm water, he remains there and becomes comfortable where he eventually dies.have you ever heard what happens to a frog who is placed in boiling water? He jumps out. But when placed in lukewarm water, he remains there and becomes comfortable where he eventually dies.have you ever heard what happens to a frog who is placed in boiling water? He jumps out. But when placed in lukewarm water, he remains there and becomes comfortable where he eventually dies.have you ever heard what happens to a frog who is placed in boiling water? He jumps out. But when placed in lukewarm water, he remains there and becomes comfortable where he eventually dies.have you ever heard what happens to a frog who is placed in boiling water? He jumps out. But when placed in lukewarm water, he remains there and becomes comfortable where he eventually dies.

In Wheaton, Illinois I had too many at the Gables a few times.  I would go home and sleeping it off.  I do remember driving slowly  up

When we lived on Scott Street in Wheaton, I once lost my car.  I was driving home from the V. F. W. club in a snow blizzard, and I had make a few runs at the little hill off Main Street to Scott Street.  Somebody behind me got out of his car and came to my window.  He said why don't you just park it over there. “You’re only a block from home, aren’t you?” He pointed me to the parking lot behind the hardware store.  I parked there and went home; but the next morning I didn't remember where I parked my car.  I was embarrassed.  I got in the old Chevy that George and given me, and I drove over to the Gables with the motor knocking loudly.  I didn't find the car.  Then I suddenly remembered parking it behind the hardware store. After I lost my job, I drank pretty heavily.  I would walk home and pass out. (I drank at a pub within three blocks of home).

After I went to Mississippi, and was alone a lot of the time, I began to get falling down drunk.  That continued after we went to West Virginia and got worse in Nashville. Fortunately, I was careful about driving in that condition. But, in 1991, the supervisors at Sky Chefs kept giving me trouble and accusing me of having a drinking problem. (There was a lot of "back-biting" because other employees wanted my job.) I decided to appease them by signing up for a Treatment Program.

 On my first day in the 28 day program, somebody said:

Write a letter.

You’ll get better. 

You can recoup.

Tell the group.

They’ll let you cry —

Anything to get by.

So I wrote a letter,

And I slowly got better.

 

Dear Ethyl,

You were only a delusion.
You caused me much confusion.
Many times I missed the clue --
That I should abandon you.
The first binge was a great thrill --
Until I got the bill.
After a night on the town,
You really let me down.
I had a gigantic head
When I got out of bed.
I should have been rich,

But you put me in a ditch.
I just tried another round,
Until I hit the ground.
When I came to,
I was missing a shoe.
I said, "I'll give it another try."
But no Cinderella was I.
I crawled on all fours --
Until I found some open doors.
From what I could surmise --
Through my bleary eyes,
The sign on the wall said,
"Welcome to Friendship Hall."
I have said farewell to many a foe --
And did not know --
That, in a little while,
We should reconcile.
But you are my nemesis.
It's not enough to build fences.
We must blow up all of our bridges,
Into tiny little smidges.
The chasm must be very wide,
With no place for you to hide.
Farewell, my fair weather friend.
I am on the mend. 

(I haven't imbibed since then.)

A few months after I left the Treatment Center, the Business Manager for our union (HERE--Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees, International) passed away and her job became available. I was selected (by the Board Members) to fulfill the rest of her term.

When that term expired, I decided not to run for the elected position, so I rejoined the ranks of the unemployed. (Also, I began collecting Social Security at age 62). I continued to rent the office on 1710 Hayes Street until 1999. I used that office while "putting together" two books and getting them published by PublishAmerica, Inc. During that time, I also worked two seasons at Opryland Theme Park and later moved to Guest Services at the hotel.

After I left there, I worked one season on the General Jackson and then back to the hotel at Delta Riverboats. From there I went to the Front Desk, where I was working on 9/11. They kept me on for a few months before terminating my position. I had learned, by this time, to use my time between jobs; a tour with my oldest grandson of my beloved WV was a terrific experience. I had not seen much of the state because we did not have a car during my pre-college years.

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